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Bishops sign Charter for a Safe and Inclusive Church

Archbishop Thabo Makgoba led the Synod of Bishops in signing the Charter.

The Anglican bishops of Southern Africa have signed a charter committing themselves to a range of steps to protect people from abuse in the church.

Bishops attending the February session of the Synod of Bishops all signed the charter after a workshop arranged by the Church’s newly-established Safe and Inclusive Ministry group.

Safe and Inclusive Ministry has two Provincial Safe Church Officers and each Diocese has its own ministry team.

Amendments to the church’s Canons will be proposed to Provincial Synod in September this year after deliberations by the Safe and Inclusive Ministry and the Canon Law Council.

The charter, presented by Rosalie Manning of Safe and Inclusive Ministry, and also a member of the Canon Law Council, reads as follows:

A CHARTER FOR SAFE AND INCLUSIVE CHURCH

Preamble

We, the Anglican Church of Southern Africa are people of God. Recognising that all people embody the spirit of God that needs to be nurtured and brought into the fullness of life. We recognise and acknowledge that our places of worship and learning have for many caused untold pain, hurt and harm, and have left individuals and families deeply scarred.

We therefore commit ourselves to a Programme of Action based on this Charter to promote a culture of safety and inclusion amongst all our people, organizations, institutions and places of worship. And through ongoing education and training to equip all who minister to prevent the occurrence of abuse and create spaces where justice and restoration can take place. And we accept this work of creating as safe and inclusive church as part of our sacred vocation as God’s people in the world.

Charter

Culture of safety and inclusivity

We recognize that a culture of safety and inclusivity needs to be grounded in our theological understanding of who we are as people of God. This understanding informs not only our approach to “being in the world, but not of the world” but also must be manifested in how we “do” Church. We therefore commit ourselves to being a people called to manifest the saving and unconditional love of God. We will promote a culture of safety and inclusion in parishes, church organizations and institutions by theological education and ongoing training to help all ministers prevent the occurrence of abuse. In addition, we commit to boldly confronting the systemic factors which create the context of abuse.

Effective Response to Abuse

We recognize that prevention is better than cure. As such we commit ourselves to taking the necessary steps to create a culture of safety and inclusion. Were abuse does occur we will implement policies and procedures we have to respond properly to allegations of abuse against all ministers within the church as defined by Act XV including but not limited to:

  • Making known within churches the procedure for making complaints;
  • Arranging pastoral care for any person making a complaint of abuse;
  • The impartial determination of allegations of abuse against a minister of the church, and assessment of their suitability for future ministry;
  • Providing support for affected parishes, organizations and institutions;

In addition, we recognize that a timeous response is of utmost importance and commit to creating processes and structures to ensure this.

Pastoral Support where there is Abuse

We will provide pastoral support for the abused and abuser; their families, affected parishes, organizations and institutions by:

  • Listening with patience and compassion to their experiences and concerns;
  • Offering spiritual assistance and other forms of pastoral care;
  • Providing practical support as those affected go on the journey of healing.

Practice of Pastoral Ministry

We remain committed to the implementation of Act XV, and promote by education and training these standards. This includes ongoing professional development of all ministers of the church as well as a commitment to their continued spiritual growth.

Suitability for Ministry

We will have and implement policies and procedures to assess the suitability of persons for ordination as clergy or appointment to positions of responsibility in the church including:

  • Practice of background checks;
  • Ongoing checks prior to each licensing appointment

Seeing More Clearly – Pastoral Letter from the Synod of Bishops

Seeing More Clearly

Pastoral Letter from the Synod of Bishops

Anglican Church of Southern Africa (ACSA)

Download PDF here >>

21st February 2019

Dear People of God,

We greet you in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

As Bishops of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa (ACSA), we met in Synod in Benoni from Monday 18th to Thursday 21st February. ACSA includes the countries of Mozambique, Angola, Namibia, St Helena, Swaziland, Lesotho and South Africa. We welcomed Bishop Dale Bowers, the new Bishop of St Helena, into our fellowship. We rejoiced that Eddie Daniels will be consecrated Bishop of Port Elizabeth on Saturday 23rd February. We were joined by the Vicars General of the Dioceses of Mzimvubu and Zululand. We said farewell to Bishops Martin Breytenbach (St Mark the Evangelist in Limpopo) and Garth Counsell (Table Bay), who will retire before our next meeting – and gave thanks for their ministries among us.

We welcomed Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and his team from The Episcopal Church (TEC) for two of our morning sessions. He shared with us the journey of TEC in the areas of marriage and human sexuality; and Safe Church – issues which we worked on during Synod of Bishops.

As always, our meeting took place within a rhythm of prayer, worship and fellowship. During our time together we shared at a personal level and wrestled with issues facing the church, local communities and our various countries.

In our readings from Mark 8 Jesus encountered various kinds of blindness. The religious leaders were not willing to see spiritually and demanded a sign even when Jesus had been working miracles among them (Mark 8:11). Jesus’ disciples failed to understand what he was doing. He said to them, “Do you still not perceive or understand? Are your hearts hardened? Do you have eyes, and fail to see? Do you have ears, and fail to hear?” (Mark 8:17-18). A blind man came to Jesus for healing. Jesus said him, “Can you see anything?” (Mark 8:23). At first he could not see clearly, but as Jesus prayed for him again his sight was fully restored.

Similarly we found that, as we looked carefully and deeply into a number of difficult issues, God began to open our eyes so that we could see and understand better. May God continue to do that work in us, and use us to lead the church into clearer vision on these things.

Human Sexuality

We received a report from the Archbishop’s Commission on Human Sexuality. The main goal of the Commission at this stage is to bring revised Pastoral Guidelines to Provincial Synod in September this year. As part of this process, the Commission will continue to conduct regional consultations in various parts of Southern Africa. Dioceses, parishes and organisations have been asked to hold workshops based on case studies and using questions that have been prepared and sent to the Diocesan Reference Teams. Feedback should be sent to the Commission by the end of June: humansexuality@anglicanchurchsa.org.za .

In all of this we were challenged by the call to learn to live with our differences, and even to live with contradiction. We realised that it will be a long term process in which we listen to God and one another. We have made mistakes in the past and will make mistakes in the future, but we are determined to journey together in the love of God and mutual respect. We are committed to finding and upholding the values of Jesus in marriage and relationships.

Safe Church Ministry

We spent a day workshopping how the church can best respond to abuse in all its forms and overcome it, so that all people can experience the Church as a safe and inclusive space. This is a process taking place throughout the Anglican Communion. Through several case studies and discussions, we considered:

  • The Charter for the safety of people within the churches of the Anglican Communion
  • The theological Principles that need to undergird our responses
  • The Process of dealing with complaints and allegations, including forms that can be used to report them and sent to: safechurch@anglicanchurchsa.org
  • The Structures that we need to put in place, such as changes to the Canons of the Church, response teams in every Diocese, and a central register to keep records.

Each Diocese is expected to set up a multi-disciplinary Safe Church Ministry Team. Training of these teams will take place later in the year, and changes to the Canons will be proposed at Provincial Synod in September. Each of the Bishops made a commitment to the Safe Church process in ACSA.

Throughout the workshop it became clear to us that a culture of secrecy about abuse is “demonic” and leads to darkness. Perhaps it comes from a fear of telling the truth, yet it is the truth that sets us free (John 8:32) and leads us into the light. We need to approach these things with deep humility, aware of our own failures, keeping the difficult balance between pastoral care for all involved and legal processes that may be required.

Resignation of the Bishop of Zululand

The Bishops considered carefully our response to the resignation of Bishop Monument Makhanya of Zululand after allegations of sexual misconduct were received. We supported the Archbishop’s acceptance of his resignation and have commented on this more fully in a Pastoral Letter addressed to the people of the Diocese of Zululand  [DOWNLOAD USING LINK] Parallel processes are being set up to care pastorally for all involved, and to institute the required Canonical steps to investigate the allegations.

Diocese of Angola

The Synod of Bishops agreed that, after a long journey, the Missionary Diocese of Angola should be granted the status of a full Diocese, with Bishop André Soares as its first Diocesan Bishop. This is an immense achievement and a source of great rejoicing as we recognise how the Anglican Church in Angola has grown. We are looking forward to the inauguration of the new Diocese and to the installation of the first Bishop of the fully-fledged Diocese after Provincial Synod in September.

Missionary Diocese of Nampula

Following the decisions of Synod of Bishops and Provincial Standing Committee last September, the inauguration of the new Missionary Diocese of Nampula – formerly part of Niassa in northern Mozambique – will be celebrated on Saturday 16th March. Former Regional Suffragan Bishop Manuel Ernesto will be installed as the first Bishop of this Missionary Diocese.

College of the Transfiguration

We rejoiced at the news that the College of the Transfiguration (COTT) has a full complement of 61 students this year, and gave thanks for generous donations that have made it possible for several poorer, women students to attend. Nevertheless it remains a challenge to support our only residential Theological College – and we appeal for your prayers and generosity. A COTT Foundation has been established to raise much needed funds.

We also received a preliminary report from the Commission into Theological Education, and look forward to their recommendations at Provincial Synod. We spent some time responding to the report of the Advisory Board on Theological Education by sharing our Diocesan processes to identify, train and nurture those whom God is calling into the ordained ministry. This included a report on progress at St Christopher’s College in Maputo. We found that we can all learn from one another, but were encouraged by how similar our approaches are.

Canon Law Council

Synod of Bishops spent time receiving a report from the Canon Law Council about proposed changes to the Canons at Provincial Synod. Among the more far reaching proposals are:

  • Major changes to Canon 4 on the Election of Bishops;
  • Changes to Canon 18 on factors to be taken into account when considering those who are nominated for election as Bishop;
  • An amendment to Canon 21 to address the situation where a Diocese falls behind in its assessment to the Common Provincial Fund or Provincial Pension Fund;
  • Changes to Canon 26, to clarify the role, deployment and licensing of Self-Supporting clergy;
  • An amendment to Canon 34 to clarify the requirements for the marriage of clergy who have been divorced;
  • To rearrange the layout and presentation of the Canons so that they are easier to follow and use.

Please pray for Provincial Synod as they prepare to debate and decide on changes to the Constitution and Canons of ACSA.

Other Important Issues

There is never enough time to address everything in depth, but we also had other useful discussions:

  • We agreed to a policy for the use of social media;
  • We heard about the need for deep work to be done to establish racial justice – not only in Southern Africa, but throughout the world;
  • We received an update on the state of the Provincial Pension Fund – and were reminded that it is critical for Dioceses to keep up with their contributions;
  • We had a very helpful talk and discussion on stress, trauma and self-care.

In our final reading from Mark 8:27-33, Jesus challenged his disciples, “Who do you say that I am?”. When Peter confessed, “You are the Messiah” Jesus “began to teach them that the Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again.” Peter and the other disciples found this hard to accept – but Jesus insisted that the cross was the only way.

In the same way we would have preferred to avoid facing up to the difficult issues before us, especially since they often expose our own failings and weaknesses. But by the power of the Holy Spirit we did our best to address them honestly and in love. We believe that we have come to see many things more clearly during this time.

We commend our reflections and work to you and ask you to continue to pray for us in our leadership role. In the name of God we implore you to open your hearts, minds, ears and eyes to what God is doing and saying in the church and world today. Thank you for your partnership in the gospel. We love you in Jesus Christ our Lord and Saviour.

1 Web Site Reference

Bishops send Pastoral Letter to Diocese of Zululand

The February meeting of the Church’s Synod of Bishops has issued a Pastoral Letter to the Diocese of Zululand, outlining the steps to be taken after the recent resignation of the Bishop of Zululand, the Right Revd Monument Makhanya.

In the letter, the Bishops said they had accepted the Bishop’s resignation, welcomed the Archbishop’s appointment of two Vicars-General, and outlined the pastoral and legal processes which will now be followed. Read and download the full text of the letter >>

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry visits the Province

MEDIA RELEASE – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 23 JANUARY 2019

THE ANGLICAN CHURCH OF SOUTHERN AFRICA PREPARES TO WELCOME THE MOST REVEREND MICHAEL B CURRY PRESIDING BISHOP OF THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH

Bishop Michael Curry, the primate of the Episcopal Church will visit the Province of Southern Africa (ACSA) in February to meet with Diocesan Bishops at their Synod, and to give the fourth Bishop David Beetge Memorial Lecture.

The three day visit will include Sunday morning worship in Johannesburg, visiting Kwasa College primary school in Springs, the Trevor Huddleston CR Memorial Centre in Sophiatown, participating in Synod reflections, meeting young Christians in Highveld, and those working to raise funds for anti-poverty programmes in the Province of ACSA.

“The heart of the visit,” said Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, “is to meet the Anglican bishops of Southern Africa at a regular meeting of their Synod, and to give the fourth Memorial Lecture in honour of the late Bishop David Beetge of the Highveld. Bishop Beetge was a leading cleric in our church and an international advocate who raised funds for the poorest of the poor before his sudden death in 2008.

“In marking the 10th anniversary of David’s passing, we celebrate his life with a lecture on the theme of peacemaking. I am delighted that Bishop Curry has agreed to deliver the lecture on his first visit as the head of our sister church.”

Public Event information:
The Fourth Memorial Lecture commemorating the late Bishop David Beetge: Sunday 17th February 2019 at 15h00 at Wits University Great Hall.

Tickets: 083 4150128 R200 per person

Notes for Editors:

About ACSA: https://anglicanchurchsa.org/

About Presiding Bishop Michael Curry: https://www.episcopalchurch.org/biography-most-rev-michael-curry

About Bishop David Beetge – Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, described Bishop Beetge as “an outstanding and exemplary leader of our church, a man of deep spirituality and prayer.” He noted that Bishop Beetge, who was the second most senior bishop in their province, also served the Anglican Communion “with great distinction” as co-chair of the International Anglican/Roman Catholic Commission on Unity and Mission (IARCCUM).”

More below © Anglican Journal

About the Trevor Huddleston Memorial Centre: https://trevorhuddleston.org

David Beetge, bishop of the diocese of Highveld, South Africa, speaks to media at the 2008 Lambeth Conference.

Many Anglican leaders today paid tribute to Bishop Beetge, who led a diocese that faced many pressing issues, including the scourge of HIV/AIDS, massive poverty, and the influx of immigrants from war-torn African nations like Zimbabwe and Mozambique.

“The Anglican Church worldwide has lost an exceptional man – warm, intelligent, utterly dedicated, imaginative; and many of us have lost a deeply valued friend,” said Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams in a statement. “David gave selflessly of his gifts in the service of the Communion, its internal business and its ecumenical relations, and carried great responsibility with calm, humour and good sense.”

Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, described Bishop Beetge as “an outstanding and exemplary leader of our church, a man of deep spirituality and prayer.” He noted that Bishop Beetge, who was the second most senior bishop in their province, also served the Anglican Communion “with great distinction” as co-chair of the International Anglican/Roman Catholic Commission on Unity and Mission (IARCCUM).”

Canon Kenneth Kearon, secretary general of the Anglican Communion, recalled that “on visits to his diocese it was clear that he was not only a beloved bishop and pastor to his clergy and people, but a bishop whose ministry reflected the heart of the gospel message in his widely diverse, vast and strong diocese.”

Bishop Beetge was “a very special friend of all of us in the London office,” said Mr. Kearon, adding, “he will be sorely missed in the workings of the Anglican Communion but his legacy is one that I am sure will inspire many of us in the days ahead.”

At July’s Lambeth Conference, Bishop Beetge passionately talked about the importance of the bishops’ march to London to pressure governments to fulfill their promise to address poverty and other issues outlined in the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). “The march will say to governments that people matter. That people matter more than arms, that people matter more than huge bureaucracies and that people must come first,” he said.

Bishop Beetge also said that the walk is going to be “a symbolic act for whoever sees it.” For the poor, it is a message “that the church cares about them.”

Bishop Beetge, who had been involved in HIV-AIDS work for the last 18 years, said the mission of the church is “the mission of Christ,” which is to minister to those “living on the edge.” He also said that his diocese is situated in an area that is struggling with 40-45 per cent unemployment and with an HIV-AIDS rate of 40 per cent. “We’ve trained 1,100 home-based workers (for HIV-AIDS) because hospitals can’t cope,” he said.

His church is also involved in other social justice initiatives, including literacy training and care for 10,000 orphans in the area.

Born in 1948 in Witbank, South Africa, Bishop Beetge received his theological education at St. Paul’s Theological College in Grahamstown. He later received both his bachelor and honour degrees in theology at the University of South Africa, and his master’s degree in theology from the University of Natal.

Ordained a priest in 1981, he served in various churches before becoming vicar general, and later the first bishop, of the diocese of South Eastern Transvaal in 1990. In 1998, the name of the diocese was changed to the diocese of the Highveld.

Bishop Beetge also served his church in many capacities at the provincial level, including as dean of the Church of the Province of Southern Africa, and as liaison bishop and chair of the Anglican HIV/AIDS programs for Southern Africa.

© Anglican Journal

An appeal for Education Sunday – 3rd February

Education Sunday – 3rd February 2019

The Archbishop has asked us to pray and actively voice our concerns about the escalation of violence in our society.

One of his areas of focus in his Christmas Day address at St George’s Cathedral was schools, and he has called on the Church to pray for schools to be free from any forms of violence. The following are some suggested areas from the Anglican Board of Education (ABE) to guide your prayers, but please contextualize them to the schools, the children and the educators in your parish.

Leadership of Schools.

Pray that the Principals and their senior management teams might be given wisdom as they lead. They hold the responsibility to keep the schools safe and to be places that are free from fear. Help them to protect both the children and educators so that all may flourish. Help them to take swift and appropriate actions against those that perpetrate violence. Thank God for good leadership and pray that Principals be given courage to act and wisdom to know what to do in difficult situations.

Pray for educators.

Pray that they might see their teaching as a calling from God. Pray that they will have hearts of understanding and compassion and that they will be enabled to create safe learning environments in their classrooms. Pray that they will actively protect the vulnerable. Pray that educators will be skilled in dealing with aggressive behaviour from children or parents and protect them from unmerited criticism and hurtful remarks. Let them find joy and satisfaction in their work.

Pray for all school children.

Pray that schools will kindle in them a desire for learning and that they will experience the joy of good education. Help them to be self-regulated, self-disciplined and self-confident so that they may pursue their education goals with courage and perseverance. Pray that they may be protected from all forms of violence –physical, mental, sexual or emotional. May they know the presence of the Spirit of Wisdom.

Pray for families and parents.

Pray that they be given wisdom in dealing with their children at home and in school. Pray that they will listen to their voices and concerns and support their sons and daughters in their education. May they have wisdom and courage to act when they see abuse and may their guidance serve to grow wisdom in their children. Help parents to be encouraging and supportive of their children and of the educators who teach them.

Pray for all Anglican schools.

Pray that each of the 350 Anglican Schools of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa (especially those located in the Western Cape) will hold up the Light, Life and Love of Christ to all the children, parents and educators who form part of their school communities. Pray for Anglican Chaplains and the local clergy who minister to these schools. Pray for their protection and that they might know God’s strength and wisdom as they witness to the love of God.

Pray for all those who govern.

Pray for those who hold responsibility as governors, both in the education departments and the school governing bodies. Pray that they may have wisdom and courage to discipline those who are corrupt, and to hold principals and educators accountable for good performance. Help them to encourage and strengthen those in need. Help them to manage their service to education in ways that will bring life and joy to our education system.

The Collect for Education Sunday

Lord God, Your Son Jesus Christ sat at the feet of others to learn, and sat on the mountains to teach:

Bless those who teach and those who learn, those who seek and those who find;

So that our homes, schools, universities and churches may be filled with a longing to learn and to grow, to serve and to give;

Through Jesus Christ our Lord; Amen

Revd. Roger Cameron

CEO: ABE

Visit www.abesa.co.za for more information about Anglican schools.

Port Elizabeth elects the Revd Dr Eddie Daniels as bishop

(Photo: Diocese of PE)

An Elective Assembly of the Diocese of Port Elizabeth has elected the Revd Dr Eddie Daniels, Rector of St Margaret’s Church in Summerstrand (left), as the next Bishop of Port Elizabeth.

Dr Daniels was ordained as priest by the then Bishop Desmond Tutu in Johannesburg in 1985. After serving in that diocese for six years, he took up a post as lecturer in the former St Paul’s College in Grahamstown for two years.

He has served in parishes in the Diocese of Port Elizabeth for the past 25 years.

He holds a Diploma in Theology from St Paul’s, a BA degree and a Master of Education degree (both from Wits University), and a Doctor of Education degree from Nelson Mandela University.

He is married to Nicky and the couple has one son, Joshua. God willing, he will be consecrated as bishop on February 23 next year. He will succeed the Right Revd Bethlehem Nopece, who retired earlier this year.

Canon John Suggit receives Archbishop’s Award for Peace with Justice

Canon John Suggit with the citation of the award conferred on him by Archbishop Thabo Makgoba.

At a service to celebrate the 70th anniversary of his ordination as priest, one of the church’s leading theologians, the Revd Canon John Suggit, has been presented with the Archbishop’s Award for Peace with Justice.

The service was held at St Margaret’s Church in Fish Hoek, in the Diocese of False Bay. Among those who attended were clergy who studied at the old St Paul’s College under Canon Suggit, including those holding a 50th anniversary reunion.

Among other recipients of the award have been Archbishop Emeritus Desmond and Mrs Leah Tutu, former South African Public Protector Thuli Madonsela, Professor Barney Pityana, former Deputy Chief Justice Dikgang Moseneke, retired President Kenneth Kaunda of Zambia and retired Bishop John Osmers of Zambia.

The citation for the award, presented by Archbishop Thabo Makgoba, follows.

The Revd Canon John Suggit came to South Africa in 1948 with his wife, Thelma, after graduating with degrees in Classics and Theology at Worcester College, Oxford. Ordained deacon and priest in Grahamstown (now Makhanda) during that year, he served successively as a curate and acting Rector at the Cathedral of St Michael and St George, then at St Hugh’s in Newton Park, Port Elizabeth – where he and his parishioners built the church as a “do-it-yourself” exercise – and at St Michael and All Angels’ in Queenstown (now Komani).

Proficient in Latin and Greek since preparatory school, and well grounded in parish ministry, he was appointed Warden of St Paul’s College in 1965, where he became renowned as an outstanding teacher, pastor and administrator. In the judgement of Bishop Duncan Buchanan, who worked with him, he was a perfectionist who insisted on the highest standards and worked with great skill to bring the college into the 20th century. After 10 years at St Paul’s, the post of Professor of New Testament Studies at Rhodes University became vacant. Interviewed for the post, his reply to why he had applied for it became the stuff of legend: it was because, he said, he wanted to learn more about the New Testament. His answer, in the words of Bishop Michael Nuttall, showed “the true mark of a scholar and teacher who is ever a disciple also.”

In turbulent times, John Suggit’s writings have played an important role in underpinning our Church and its witness. His devotion to the centrality of the Eucharist and his example as a model of what priesthood should be are an inspiration to us all. The Anglican Church of Southern Africa is honoured to recognise this pastor, prophet and priest who has selflessly dedicated his life to the liberation and welfare of God’s people with the Archbishop’s Award for Peace with Justice.

Consecration & Installation of Bishop Dale Bowers of St Helena

Reporting and photos: Sharon and Darrin Henry of ‘What The Saints Did Next

History was made on Sunday 11th November with the consecration and enthronement of Dale Bowers as the 16th Bishop of the island of St Helena.

See full report below the slideshow…

History was made on Sunday 11th November with the consecration and enthronement of Dale Bowers as the 16th Bishop of the island of St Helena.

Dale is the second island-born bishop and it is believed this was the first consecration of a bishop on the island.

The ceremony took place at St Paul’s Cathedral and was led by the Most Revd Dr Thabo Cecil Makgoba, visiting Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa.

It was a colourful, memorable and for some, an emotional occasion that was broadcast live via radio to reach beyond the estimated congregation of 300. Bishop Dale’s sons, Jacob and Luke, attended the ceremony as acolytes and his wife Penny stood proudly at the front.

Accompanying Archbishop Thabo were the Rt Revd Stephen Molopi Diseko, Dean of the Province and Bishop of Matlosane, and the Rt Revd Allan John Kannemeyer, Bishop of Pretoria, along with the Revd Mcebisi Pinyana, the Archbishop’s chaplain, who all flew in from Johannesburg the previous day.

Once the consecration section of the service was done, Bishop Dale and the Procession left the cathedral via the vestry, and – following tradition for the enthronement – pounded his staff three times on the west door to request permission to enter the cathedral.

He was welcomed inside by Sylvia Ivy Ellick, Registrar of the Diocese of St Helena. He then swore, ‘to respect, maintain, and defend the rights, privileges and liberties of this Diocese and to rule it with truth, justice and love, not lording it over God’s heritage, but showing myself in all things an example to the flock of Christ.’

In an uplifting sermon Archbishop Thabo paid tribute to the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War. Partway through the service he spoke in four languages representative of the different provinces.

Bishop Dale previously served as vicar of the Jamestown Parish. He replaces Bishop Richard Fenwick who retired in May this year.

The Diocese of St Helena was founded in 1859 and is the 4th oldest diocese of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa.

RSCM honours Cape Town choir conductor

[Rebecca Malambo – Diocese of Cape Town] St George’s Cathedral choir conductor Jonathan Langenhoven travelled to England with his wife Susan in September 2018 to receive an award from the Royal School of Church Music (RSCM) in recognition for his services to church music.

He was honoured as an associate of the RSCM  during a celebration service at Salisbury Cathedral on September 8th. The award was presented to Jonathan by the Rt Revd Nick Holtam, bishop of Salisbury.

Jonathan was one of 9 recipients of the ARSCM award for 2018 and the only recipient from Africa this year. The RSCM is an international organization, with headquarters in the UK, which aims to encourage and support music in churches. It is represented in the UK, USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa.

 

 

 

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