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Mozambique, Angola plan new Province

The proposed expansion of three dioceses to eight in Mozambique.

Exciting plans to triple the number of dioceses in Mozambique and Angola and inaugurate a new, Portuguese-speaking Province of the Anglican Communion were outlined at this year’s meeting of ACSA’s Provincial Standing Committee.

Bishop Carlos Matsinhe of Lebombo reported to PSC that the legislative bodies of the four existing dioceses – those of Lebombo, Niassa and Nampula in Mozambique, and the Diocese of Angola – supported the proposal for a new Province, made by Archbishop Thabo Makgoba at Provincial Synod last year.

“… [A]s bishops, we have spoken with the laity and clergy of our dioceses and we are keeping the discussion on this matter high in our parishes and congregations,” Bishop Carlos said in his presentation.

“…[I]n each area to become a new diocese we have put in place Task Force Committees to work out the details as required by the Provincial guidelines.

“All four bishops and their dioceses feel very much encouraged by the last Synod of Bishops that affirmed and endorsed the process. This encouragement carries a deep spiritual and missiological intent.”

Bishop Carlos added that the church in the two nations needed to disciple more Anglicans.

“Our Anglican Church is already recognized by our civil society and authorities as a serious partner in the areas of peace building, public health and poverty eradication…

“This recognition poses a challenge of growth, effective presence and relevant witness which we cannot do well from a distance. We need more bishops to bring down their episcopal ministry to where many congregations are.”

The new church would be called Igreja Anglicana de Moçambique e Angola (Iama), Bishop Carlos said.

He noted that the existing four dioceses in Mozambique and Angola covered huge distances, making travel time-consuming for their bishops. Citing an example of the difficulties, he said traversing the Diocese of Niassa from east to west involved travelling through Malawi.

He said that five new dioceses in Mozambique and three in Angola are proposed. “The province will start with 12 bishops… Of course this is going to be a long journey, which we are asking you to let us start, and pray for us.”

In a resolution proposed by Bishop Carlos and seconded by Bishop Andre Soares of Angola, PSC supported and endorsed the vision. An application for a new Province has to be approved by the wider Anglican Communion.

Four dioceses are planned for Angola.
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PSC calls for action against GBV, empowerment of women

Vigorous efforts were made at the 2020 session of ACSA’s Provincial Standing Committee to improve the representation of women in church leadership structures, in part as a way of addressing more urgently issues affecting women in the church such as patriarchy and gender-based violence.

In one motion, it was suggested that male-only delegations to PSC and synods be disqualified from attending. In another, a three-year moratorium on the election of men as bishops was proposed. However, the Provincial Chancellor, Adv Ian Farlam SC, said these moves would contravene the Canons, and PSC instead adopted language strongly urging better representation of women.

A motion on gender-based violence (GBV), proposed by Bishop Margaret Vertue of False Bay and seconded by Bishop Nkosinathi Ndwandwe of Mthatha, said inter alia that “All male delegations to synods and PSC should be disqualified until they [the delegations] meet the required level of representation.” But the sentence was withdrawn after Adv Farlam’s intervention.

The final resolution adopted called for the elimination of GBV to be adopted as a Lenten theme in 2021, that all dioceses develop programmes for combating the scourge, that relevant liturgies be adopted and that the Province’s Theological Commission identify doctrines, beliefs and practices – such as theologies of male headship, female submission and codes of purity – “that need to be eliminated to ensure that our teachings and practices are life-giving for both women and men.”

An amendment, proposed by Archbishop Thabo Makgoba and seconded by Bishop Ebenezer Ntali of Grahamstown, resulted in the final resolution on women in the episcopate encouraging Elective Assembly committees to “prayerfully and intentionally search the length and breadth of the Province to seek out to be nominated women clergy who fit the profile for consideration for the bishopric.”

In a third resolution, PSC acknowledged the leadership of Archbishop Thabo Makgoba “in strengthening the efficacy of Church procedures to ensure that all forms of abuse in our churches, and schools and institutions are addressed and eradicated.” It expressed gratitude to him and his family “for absorbing the public criticism levelled against the… Church with gentleness and grace, and his pastoral heart in seeking justice, healing and restoration for all.”

The full text of the three resolutions follows:

MOTION ON GENDER BASED VIOLENCE

Noting with urgency that women are being murdered daily and that Gender-based violence is increasing in society at alarming levels. GBV is a cause of consequence of gender inequality and injustice.

Noting that Gender Based Violence is primarily violence perpetrated by men on women. These men are quite often a loved one, trusted leader or close relative.

Noting that in the context of this global pandemic, occurrences of GBV have increased making GBV a shadow pandemic.

Noting the presence of a Gender programme in ACSA with a comprehensive strategy, however without substantial resources to ensure effective implementation of the programme, which includes dealing with the scourge of GBV, Gender sensitisation and addressing the issues of masculinity.

Acknowledging the role of the church in being complicit in allowing GBV to go unchallenged and that GBV flourishes in an environment of silence, shame and stigma, of unbelief and avoiding so called difficult conversations and justice.

Acknowledging that patriarchy is evil, a sin and a heresy, especially when interpreting scriptures to reinforce concepts of male dominance and headship. It is evidenced in our teachings on the sanctity of marriage, family values and the subservience of women. It is also evidenced in our liturgy and language that excludes women.Acknowledging that as a province we have passed many resolutions on GBV, inclusive language, diversity and representation. It is time now to act.

Acknowledging the presence and work of the Safe Church Commission

This PSC hereby resolves:

1. That all dioceses revisit the communication from Synod of Bishops February 2020 that declared a state of emergency on GBV and immediately put in place a programme to deal with the scourge of GBV.

2. That each diocese has a dedicated gender officer or task team that liaises with HOPE Africa as well as all provincial organisations involved in training and programmes on GBV, so that these programmes get to diocesan and parish level.

3. The Provincial Liturgical Committee create a Season that focus on GBV, with Readings, Prayers, Liturgical materials, Sermon outlines and materials for Small Group Bible Studies.

4. That we ensure that all our liturgies are transformed to be gender inclusive and all dioceses request that each Parish uses these gender inclusive liturgies.

5. That we immediately stop referring to male priests as “Father” and begin to use more gender inclusive titles like Reverend, Moruti, etc.

6. That we respectfully request the Metropolitan to request the Anglican Theological Commission to identify doctrines, beliefs and practices that need to be eliminated to ensure that our teachings and practices are life-giving for both women and men. These should include but not be limited to theologies of male headship, female submission, family values, codes of purity, discourses of protection and pity.

7. That we respectfully respect the Archbishop to declare a theme for Lent of 2021 to focus on GBV.

8. To strive to have equal representation of women at all leadership and decision making levels of the church.

9. That the ACSA budget includes an adequate financial allocation to deal with GBV.

10. That all Dioceses adopt and promote the “Thursdays in Black” campaign against GBV.

11. That the liturgical committee write a prayer for women (like the Prayer for Africa) to be prayed at every Eucharistic celebration.

12. That men become more involved in challenging patriarchy and GBV. This should begin with a men’s webinar, where men speak about their experience of male privilege.

WOMEN IN THE EPISCOPATE

The Anglican Church of Southern Africa profoundly recognises the right of all Baptised Anglicans in our Province, irrespective of race, culture, language, gender or sexuality to be full Members of ACSA with all its rights and privileges. This baptismal/sacramental experience allows women the opportunity for serious and prayerful consideration for both the priesthood and the episcopate; and the Bishop of Grahamstown, at this Session of PSC, reminded the Committee that, notwithstanding the slow progress of ACSA in respect of women to the episcopate, that there is definitively “light at the end of the tunnel.”

This PSC calls on:

The Synod of Bishops and Dioceses to encourage that where there are vacancies of bishoprics, that the Elective Assembly committees prayerfully and intentionally search the length and breadth of the Province to seek out to be nominated women clergy who fit the profile for consideration for the bishopric.

LEADERSHIP OF ARCHBISHOP THABO MAKGOBA

That this PSC:

● Acknowledges the leadership given by Archbishop Thabo in strengthening the efficacy of Church procedures to ensure that all forms of abuse in our churches, and schools and institutions are addressed and eradicated;

● Wishes to appreciate his humility in seeking advice and for his gentleness in dealing with our human failures and frailty as well as his own;

● Expresses its unequivocal support for the Archbishop in the exercise of his leadership role in Church and Society;

● Assures the Archbishop and his family of our love, prayers and gratitude for absorbing the public criticism levelled against the Anglican Church with gentleness and grace, and his pastoral heart in seeking justice, healing and restoration for all.

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Snippets from PSC

Among decisions taken by the Provincial Standing Committee at its annual meeting in the last week of September:

  • Elective assemblies to fill episcopal vacancies in four dioceses – Kimberley & Kuruman, Lesotho, Natal and Zululand – are to be held “virtually”. The assemblies have been delayed by coronavirus lockdowns. PSC resolved that Archbishop Thabo Makgoba will issue mandates to Vicars-General in each Diocese “to summon the Elective Assembly to meet in a Virtual Gathering, by Video Conferencing, if necessary.”
  • In view of restrictions on funerals and travel during the coronavirus, clergy are reminded of “the importance of the service of ‘Commemoration of the Faithful Departed’ as a pastoral opportunity to provide comfort and support to those who mourn.”
  • PSC rejected a proposal to explore holding “virtually” the Lambeth Conference, the once-a-decade meeting of bishops and their spouses from around the world. This year’s Lambeth Conference has been postponed until 2022, as a result of which ACSA’s Provincial Synod, originally due to meet in 2022, will be held next year.
  • PSC expressed its gratitude to the SA Council of Churches for its leadership during the lockdown in South Africa and its initiatives on a basic income grant, corruption and gender-based violence.
  • The Palestinian Study Group set up after last year’s Provincial Synod was asked to prepare a presentation and resources on “the daily reality of the situation” in Palestine for dioceses and parishes.

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Environmental Racism – When #Blacklives Don’t Matter

The following resolution was adopted by Provincial Standing Committee 2020, proposed and seconded respectively by Ms Basetsana Makena and Mr Bino Makhalanyane, youth representatives to PSC:

This PSC Noting that:

The world responded with urgency and speed to the challenge of COVID-19, which affected all countries.

The world has been slow to respond to climate change, clinging to an increasingly precarious and unjust economic system. It is predominantly Black lives that are being impacted by drought, flooding, storms and sea level rise. The delayed global response to climate injustice gives the impression that #blacklivesdontmatter. Without urgent action, Black lives will continue to be the most impacted, being dispossessed from their lands and becoming climate refugees.

We saw how COVID-19 swept through crowded vulnerable communities unable to socially distance; how rural communities without effective sanitation cannot keep themselves safe. Pollution affects the poor and people of colour the most, toxic dump sites are placed next to poor communities; indigenous people are forced off their land, air pollution is worst in poor communities of colour.

We stand at a Kairos moment – in order to fight environmental injustice, we must also fight racial injustice.

In the words of Archbishop Tutu, “If you are neutral in times of injustice you have chosen the side of the oppressor.”

This PSC affirms

The Statement on Environmental Racism issued by the Anglican Communion Environmental Network (ACEN) issued June 19, 2020, a day known as Juneteenth in the United States, marking and remembering the official end of slavery in that country in 1865. This Statement was signed globally by the Archbishop of Canterbury, 12 Archbishops and over 60 Bishops.

Let us take action for climate justice to show #blacklivesmatter.

This PSC Commits to:

Prioritising climate action by

– Online meetings: Committing to using online meetings wherever possible, in order to reduce plane and car travel.

– Combatting Deforestation: As a Church, encouraging a halt on the cutting of indigenous forests, and the roll out of indigenous or fruit tree planting from the symbolic tens to the hundreds and thousands. Promote alternatives to charcoal and wood burning.

– Solar energy: When hot water geysers need to be replaced on church or rectory property, install solar geysers. Explore mini-grid renewable energy systems.

Communicate internationally: Make the impact of climate change known to our companion Dioceses and at other events where we are invited to speak or communicate.

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PSC calls on Govts to ‘Build Back Better’ after Covid-19

The following resolution was approved by the recent meeting of ASCA’s Provincial Standing Committee:

This PSC, noting:

The Corona pandemic has exposed the deep health and economic inequalities in our nations. “The virus has exposed the unsustainable foundations on which it is built… that must be urgently fixed,” said Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

We cannot go back to ‘business as usual’ once COVID-19 is under control. We need a new vision. Our call is for a more just and fair world, for humans and for the web of life on which we depend. The challenge is to envision a different post COVID19 society “a more equitable future, a more just future, a gentler future”. (Archbishop Thabo). We need to use the post COVID19 rebuild period to implement goals of wellbeing and sustainability, ending inequality and environmental destruction.

Our present lifestyle and economic system is severely dysfunctional, resulting in environmental destruction, causing climate change and extinction of millions species. The resultant breakdown of our life support systems is causing increasing inequality, poverty and migration.

Resolves to:

a) Call upon our Governments to implement the Basic Income Grant to reduce abject poverty and malnutrition.

b) Call for post COVID-19 Government spending to prioritise job creation in green jobs in the following areas:

· Clean power. Invest in local small scale renewable mini-grid energy solutions. End fossil fuel subsidies immediately

· Invest in public transport. Increase funding for safe, efficient and affordable public transport, which includes electric vehicles.

· Deliver energy efficient homes. Build new houses which are energy efficient and retrofit existing buildings.

· Food security: Invest in more sustainable and nature-based climate resilient solutions. Encourage farmers to move away from industrial farming practices to agroecological systems, supporting small scale farmers and promoting home food gardens.

· Avoid rollbacks of environmental protection legislation and ensure foreign economic assistance is used to support resilient and carbon neutral recovery and development.

· Land and marine sanctuaries: Support the call for 30% of land and coastal waters to be set aside as sanctuaries to save critically threatened terrestrial and marine life.

Respectfully requests

Each member of PSC to sign an open letter to the Heads of State in the countries served by the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, delivering this resolution.

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PSC Resolution on Discrimination at Anglican Schools

Provincial Standing Committee devoted considerable debate to recent discussion of discrimination in Anglican schools.

A resolution proposed by Ms. Kim Williams of the Diocese of False Bay, and seconded by Mr. Teboho Makhalanyane of the Provincial Youth Council, was adopted after a number of amendments were accepted, including wording recognising that some schools are addressing the problem but urging them to speed up the process. The resolution reads:

This PSC,

Noting:

  1. The Church’s mission to seek to secure the rights of all human beings irrespective of colour, gender, sexuality and nationality;
  2. The number of former and current learners who have disclosed discrimination at our Anglican schools on the grounds of their racial background, sexuality or nationality;
  3. Some of our Anglican schools are addressing this critical need and are encouraged to hasten the process.

Therefore respectfully requests:

  1. This PSC release a statement that ACSA does not support any form of discrimination and assures the victims of its prayers and support.
  2. The Metropolitan to form a Provincial task team to work with the different Anglican Schools to:
    2.1 make recommendations on how best the ACSA can address discrimination issues at our Diocesan schools;
    2.2 give feedback at the 2021 Provincial sitting (be it Synod or PSC).
  3. The Safe and Inclusive Church Commission to set up a secure monitored email address at which students can report issues of discrimination.

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PSC resolutions on abuse & GBV

The following resolutions on gender-based violence and Archbishop Thabo Makgoba’s leadership on the issue were approved by the 2020 meeting of Provincial Standing Committee on September 24:

Motion on Gender Based Violence

Noting with urgency that women are being murdered daily and that Gender based violence is increasing in society at alarming levels; GBV is a cause of consequence of gender inequality and injustice.

Noting that Gender Based Violence is primarily violence perpetrated by men on women; these men are quite often a loved one, trusted leader or close relative.

Noting that in the context of this global pandemic, occurrences of GBV have increased, making GBV a shadow pandemic.

Noting the presence of a Gender programme in ACSA with a comprehensive strategy, however without substantial resources to ensure effective implementation of the programme, which includes dealing with the scourge of GBV, Gender sensitisation and addressing the issues of masculinity.

Acknowledging the role of the church in being complicit in allowing GBV to go unchallenged and that GBV flourishes in an environment of silence, shame and stigma, of unbelief and avoiding so called difficult conversations and justice.

Acknowledging that patriarchy is evil, a sin and a heresy, especially when interpreting scriptures to reinforce concepts of male dominance and headship. It is evidenced in our teachings on the sanctity of marriage, family values and the subservience of women. It is also evidenced in our liturgy and language that excludes women.

Acknowledging that as a province we have passed many resolutions on GBV, inclusive language, diversity and representation. It is time now to act.

Acknowledging the presence and work of the Safe Church Commission.

This PSC hereby resolves:

  1. That all dioceses revisit the communication from SOB Feb 2020 that declared a state of emergency on GBV and immediately put in place a programme to deal with the scourge of GBV.
  2. That each diocese has a dedicated gender officer or task team that liaises with HOPE Africa as well as all provincial organisations involved in training and programmes on GBV, so that these programmes get to diocesan and parish level.
  3. The Provincial Liturgical Committee to create a Season that focus on GBV, with Readings, Prayers, Liturgical materials, Sermon outlines and materials for Small Group Bible Studies.
  4. That we ensure that all our liturgies are transformed to be gender inclusive and all dioceses request that each Parish uses these gender inclusive liturgies.

THAT THIS PSC:

Acknowledges the leadership given by Archbishop Thabo in strengthening the efficacy of Church procedures to ensure that all forms of abuse in our churches, schools and institutions are addressed and eradicated;

Appreciates his humility in seeking advice and his gentleness in dealing with our human failures and frailty as well as his own;

Expresses its unequivocal support for the Archbishop in the exercise of his leadership role in Church and Society;

Assures the Archbishop and his family of our love, prayers and gratitude for absorbing the public criticism levelled against the Anglican Church with gentleness and grace, and his pastoral heart in seeking justice, healing and restoration for all.

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Communiqué from the Bishops

COMMUNIQUE FROM THE SYNOD OF BISHOPS

ANGLICAN CHURCH OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

SEPTEMBER 2020

To the beloved People of God,

Grace and peace to you!

The Synod of Bishops met virtually by video conferencing from Bishopscourt and Diocesan Centres from Monday 21 September to Tuesday 22 September 2020 as result of the challenging times prompted by Covid-19. Despite these difficulties there is much to be celebrated in the Province for faithful and committed service throughout the 150 years of our history in a world of human failure, corruption and violence. The Service of Celebration on Sunday 20 September 2020 with the Archbishop of Canterbury was witnessed by many people across the Province and the Anglican Communion.

Synod began with Morning Prayer, where we heard a homily from the Rt Revd Luke Pato, Bishop of Namibia, on the Season of Creation. The emphasis on Eden as a place of communion with God and harmony with the created order set the scene for a discussion of issues of violence, injustice, corruption and inequality, which are prevalent in our countries.

The Archbishop welcomed the Bishop of Table Bay, the Rt Revd Joshua Louw, who was attending Synod for the first time. The presenting Bishops, the Rt Revd Margaret Vertue and the Rt Revd Raphael Hess, reported on Bishop Joshua’s Consecration and Installation to bring on board those bishops who could not attend the service. Comments were made about the beauty of the liturgy, its awe and reverence. Also in attendance at Synod were three Vicars-General, the Very Revd Tanki Mofana from Lesotho, the Very Revd Carol Starkey from Kimberley and Kuruman and the Very Revd Ndabezinhle Sibisi from Natal. The Archbishop expressed his appreciation for the quality of leadership displayed by the Vicars-General, especially in Natal where there had been some serious challenges.

Synod met against the backdrop of COVID-19 and reflected on the impact of the pandemic and lockdown on families and the mission and ministry of the Church. Synod shared experiences and struggles of people and churches as a result of COVID. Most parishes adopted “virtual worship” initiatives by offering services via Facebook, YouTube, WhatsApp and the like. Lesotho opened a new radio station. The biggest challenge was the inability to retain all stipendiary Clergy on the payroll in some Dioceses. It was suggested that our church must learn to move away from cash collections to swipe machines as many organisations already do that.

Synod received preliminary reports on the Archbishop’s Commissions on Human Sexuality, Safe and Inclusive Church and on the election of Women to the Episcopate.

The Archbishop’s Commission on Human Sexuality called on the bishops to note that the issue of Human Sexuality concerns more than the question of Same-Sex Unions. It is a human experience involving physical, emotional and spiritual dimensions that require theological, structural and social responses from the Church. It was noted with sadness that in most Dioceses clergy are reluctant to discuss this issue. It was recommended that the Pastoral Guidelines for Same-Sex Unions be completed as a matter of urgency. The Commission further revealed that of one million babies born in South Africa in 2019, 60% are from single parents and of those, about 40% were cared for by women alone. Many men do not take the responsibility of family and children. Gender-based Violence (GBV) is also a result of this kind of behaviour.

Bishop Margaret Vertue addressed the Bishops on GBV and highlighted that it escalated during lockdown, especially during the first few weeks. It was recommended that adequate teaching and awareness-raising on abuse be offered to men and then children. There is a great need for perpetrators and the Church as a whole to repent for its complicity and silence in the face of Gender-based Violence. Male priests have often in the past tended to take sides with perpetrators, so determined are they to save marriages. As a result, victims are forced to declare forgiveness for perpetrators against their will or when they are not yet ready to do so. The Church needs eyes to see the problem, ears to hear the victims and big hearts to respond with courage and compassion.

Synod was strongly challenged to be intentional in its efforts to improve the participation of women in the leadership of the Church. Much more attention needs to be given to establishing and strengthening support mechanisms for women. The election of women to the episcopate needs to be discussed in the context of wider gender conversations.

The Dioceses in Mozambique and Angola updated Synod members on the vision for the formation of a Portuguese-speaking Province. Synod reaffirmed its support for the vision. We also heard of the plight of victims of terrorism in Cabo Delgado and Central regions. The Synod was informed of the creation of the Anglican Peace and Reconciliation Initiative for Mozambique and Angola (APRIMA), which has its aim spreading the gospel message by physically sharing life with the displaced, channelling Christian and humanitarian solidarity to the affected and developing community dialogue. The team from APRIMA appreciated the encouragement and support given for these developments and appealed to Synod for more support.

Synod expressed its deepest gratitude to the team that put together and managed the technology for video conferencing, including the Ven Grant Walters, Quintin Christian and his team. Everything worked exceptionally well.

We commend you to God’s love and keeping, and ask you to remember us in prayer as we meet in Provincial Standing Committee to discern God’s will as we grapple with the critical issues that face us as Church.

To him who is able to keep you from falling, and to make you stand without blemish in the presence of his glory with rejoicing – to the only God our Saviour, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, power and authority, before all time and now and forever! Amen.” — Jude 24-25

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Top lawyers licensed to advise Church

Leading Anglican lawyers have been licensed as Provincial office-bearers who assist the Church with legal advice.

During Evening Prayer on the first day of this year’s meeting of the Provincial Standing Committee, Archbishop Thabo licensed:

  • Mr. Lloyd Fortuin as the new Provincial Registrar;
  • Adv. Palesa Ncholo as the new Provincial Deputy Registrar; and
  • Adv. Ewald de Villiers-Jansen SC and Judge Richard Brooks as Provincial Deputy Chancellors.

They join Judge Ian Farlam, who is Provincial Chancellor, and Canon Rosalie Manning, who is also a Provincial Deputy Registrar.

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ACSA News & Notices News

OR Tambo, Keith Griffiths receive ACSA award

The Archbishop’s Award for Peace with Justice was conferred upon O R Tambo, posthumously, and on the Revd Keith Griffiths at a service marking the 150th anniversary of the Province on Tuesday.

The service was hosted in the Bishopscourt chapel in Cape Town, joined by a representative of the Tambo family at the Diocese of Johannesburg. The service was held under conditions of coronavirus lockdown during the annual meeting of the Provincial Standing Committee.

The citation for Mr Tambo, leader of the ANC in exile, noted that he attended Holy Cross Mission School at Flagstaff, then went on to study at St. Peter’s School, Rosettenville, and to live in Beda Hall, the Anglican hostel at the University of Fort Hare.

“The life of Oliver Tambo was rooted in his Christian faith and in the Anglican Church,” the citation added. Father Trevor Huddleston became his “religious model” and Bishop Ambrose Reeves accepted him for ordination training. But his arrest ahead of the Treason Trial, then being sent into exile, thwarted him. Mr Tambo was also credited with winning over leaders of the World Council of Churches to support the liberation struggle.

The citation for Father Griffiths said his devotion to liturgy and liturgical renewal has been central to his ministry.

“He has served on the Steering Committee of the International Anglican Liturgical Consultation and was recently elected as its Chairperson,” the citation contiuned.

“He loves all things liturgical and is willing to experiment with new liturgies, always meticulous in ensuring that the words and the flow of worship fit well together. His dedication to preparing worship and liturgies for Provincial Synod and Provincial Standing Committee has been exemplary.

“Across the Christian Church in Southern Africa, Keith is known as a pastor with an ecumenical spirit. He is well respected for his work with Ekklesia and the publication of Word and Worship, which focuses on the Revised Common Lectionary. His ability to write, edit and distribute liturgical resources is phenomenal and he ensures that areas that are difficult to reach are not left behind.”

The service at Bishopscourt was webcast live on Facebook.

The Revd Natalie Simons-Arendse reads the citation for the Revd Keith Griffiths.
Bishop Steve Moreo of Johannesburg reads the citation for OR Tambo as his grandson, Zachary Kingston, looks on.